*Free Shipping on Orders Over $79.99

Cat Care

October 08, 2015

Posted in


National Preparedness Month for Your Pets

You likely have an preparedness plan for your family in the event of a natural disaster or emergency. But have you included your pet in those plans? As a pet parent, its your responsibility to take your four-legged family members under consideration when planning for an problems that might cause you to flee or evacuate your home.


You likely have an preparedness plan for your family in the event of a natural disaster or emergency. But have you included your pet in those plans? As a pet parent, its your responsibility to take your four-legged family members under consideration when planning for an problems that might cause you to flee or evacuate your home.


emergency.jpg


Here are some item to be sure you have on hand for your pet in case of emergency. And be sure to keep all of this as close to an exit as possible:


  • Your pets information including dog tag numbers, chip information, photocopies of medical records
  • Your vets phone number
  • Extra collars, harnesses and leashes
  • A travel crate or carrier for each pet (put your dogs info and your name on the carrier)
  • At least five days worth of food
  • Bottles of water
  • Extra kitty litter and an aluminum roasting pan for cats
  • Feeding dishes
  • At least a weeks supply of any pet medications or pet vitamins
  • A pet first-aid kit
  • Flea and tick treatments
  • A recent photo of your pet in case they are lost
  • A blanket
  • Trash bags
  • Paper towels
  • Grooming supplies

Other things to help in being prepared for your pet in an emergency:


  • Ask your vet for a list of preferred boarding kennels and facilities.
  • Contact local animal shelters to see if they provide emergency shelter or foster care for pets.
  • Make a list of hotels or motels outside of your immediate area that accept pets.
  • Determine in advance if there are friends and relatives outside your immediate area willing to take in your pet.
  • If you are asked to shelter in place, seeks out rooms offer safe havens (clear of hazards such as windows, and flying debris) and these rooms should be easy-to-clean such as utility rooms, bathrooms, and basements.


September 09, 2015

Posted in


Keep Your Pets Safe on Halloween

Halloween is coming up fast. its time to put up the spooky decor and think about costumes. But while youre planning your familys fun night of fright, dont forget about your pets. All Hallows Eve can be a scary time for pets, but there are ways to ensure they are kept safe, happy and healthy.

halloween4.jpg

Halloween is coming up fast. its time to put up the spooky decor and think about costumes. But while youre planning your familys fun night of fright, dont forget about your pets.


All Hallows Eve can be a scary time for pets, but there are ways to ensure they are kept safe, happy and healthy.

halloween2.jpg


No candy - Most pet owners know that dogs are extremely bad reactions to chocolate and it can even even be lethal. Still other candy made with the artificial sweetener xylitol can also be poisonous to dogs. Even small amounts of xylitol can cause a sudden drop in blood sugar and subsequent loss of coordination and seizures. Keep your pets away from the treats.


Keep pets inside - Dont leave your pets outside as cruel pranksters have been known to tease, injure, steal, and even kill pets on Halloween night. Be sure pets are confined in a room away from the door. It will be scary for your pets to see a flow of strangers dressed in unusual costumes and yelling loudly for candy. Also, dogs are especially territorial and may become anxious and growl at innocent trick-or-treaters. Place your dog or cat in a secure room away from the front door will also prevent them from darting outside into the night.


Tags! - Make sure your pet is properly identified (microchip, collar and ID tag) in case they escape through the open door while you're distracted with trick-or-treater.


halloween3.jpg

Pumpkins and pets don't mix - Keep Halloween plants such as pumpkins and decorative corn out of reach. Although these are mostly considered to be nontoxic, they can cause a very upset stomach.


Put Halloween decor out of reach - Jack O'Lanterns, luminaries, candles and even string lights can be a hazard for pets. Any lits decorative item is risk for pets burning themselves should they get too close or causing a fire if these items are knocked over. String lights can be chewed and cause electrical shock.

Be cautious about Pet costumes - We all admit that pets in costumes is over the top adorable - for us as humans. But pets dont often have the same love of dressing up. Many dogs find costumes annoying. Plus, they can be unsafe if your pets movement is restricted, it interferes with hearing or sight, or doesnt let them bark or meow. Try pet costumes on the night before to be sure your pet will be okay wearing it. And, be sure that the costume doesn't have any pieces that can easily be chewed off.




halloween 1.jpg


IdealPetX.com loves pets and wants to make sure they are safe and happy. To keep your furry friends healthy visit IdeaPetX for all your dog and cat supplies, supplements, and accessories.