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Dog Care

December 24, 2015

Posted in Dog care


Happy Holidays to All Pet Parents


Christmas Dog

by Shel Silverstein

Tonight's my first night as a watchdog,

And here it is Christmas Eve.

The children are sleeping all cozy upstairs,

While I'm guardin' the stockin's and tree.

What's that now---footsteps on the rooftop?

Could it be a cat or a mouse?

Who's this down the chimney?

A thief with a beard--- And a big sack for robbin' the house?

I'm barkin', I'm growlin', I'm bitin' his butt.

He howls and jumps back in his sleigh.

I scare his strange horses, they leap in the air.

I've frightened the whole bunch away.

Now the house is all peaceful and quiet again.

The stockin's are safe as can be.

Won't the kiddies be glad when they wake up tomorrow

And see how I've guarded the tree.

 

IdealPetX.com wishes Seasons Greetings all the pet parents and a happy, healthy and joyous holiday to their furry friends.

December 18, 2015

Posted in Dog care


Curbing Your Dog's Holiday Separation Anxiety

It’s busy time of year for you and your family. It’s likely that you’re running around, attending parties and gatherings, out shopping, and generally deviating from your normal schedule. While this hectic time can take a toll on you, it’s likely it’s also impacting your pets.

If you’re leaving your pets alone while you attend recitals and holiday pageants, tree lightings, buy gifts, and head to gatherings, your four-legged friends might be experiencing separation anxiety.

Dogs with this separation anxiety will show signs within 20-45 minutes after you leave.Typical behaviors include digging, gnawing, and scratching at doors and windows inside, and gates and fences outside. This is an attempt to break out of confinement and reconnect with you; barking, whining and howling to try to get you to come back; and going potty in the house as the result of panic.

The Signs

  • The behavior happens only or mostly when your dog is alone
  • Your dog follows you around the house when you are home
  • Your dog is frenetic when you return home
  • This behavior occurs regardless of how long your gone
  • Your dog appears sad or anxious when you are about to leave

Take Action

  • Don’t go overboard when you return home. Pay no attention to your dog for a short time, until they sit or calm down a little, then you acknowledge them.
  • Leaving your dog with something that has your scent on it - like recently worn t-shirt.
  • Create a “safety cue”–an action or word that you use every time you leave that tells your dog you’ll be back. Dogs learn to associate definite cues with the knowledge that you will come back.

The Don’ts

  • Never punish your dog. While separation anxiety can be frustrating for your dog and you, punishment for destructive behavior and can make the problem even worse.
  • Don’t get another pet to keep your pet company.Separation anxiety is a result of being away from you -not simply being alone.
  • Don’t leave your dog in a crate for extended periods.Confinement does not reduce anxiety and destructive behavior. it may encourage more destructive behavior as they feel it is a punishment.
November 24, 2015

Posted in Dog care, food


Can Your Dog Have Turkey on Thanksgiving?

It’s that time of year to give thanks. If you’re a pet parent, you’re likely thankful everyday for your four-legged friend. It’s also time for a big holiday feast. And like people, dogs love turkey. In fact, many dog foods are made with tukey.

It's okay to share a little bit of your Thanksgiving turkey with your dog. Go for the leaner turkey meat (white rather and fatty dark meat). Skip the crispy skin, it’s probably too salty and fatty for your pooch. Also be sure to put the turkey meat in their bowl and make sure there are no bones. Like chicken bones, turkey bones can splinter and cause harm to your pet’s internal digestive system or result in choking.

And while you are excited about the tukey as the centerpiece of your meal, your dog is probably eyeing the bird too - and your dog  might go to great lengths to try and get some of your delicious meal.

Here are a few really simple precautions you can take to keep your dog safe:

When getting ready to cook and prep, don’t leave uncooked turkey unattended on the kitchen counter. Raw meat can contain harmful bacteria and you dog will likely be tempted by the smell.

Before you sit down to eat, clear away everything associated with the turkey such as tin foil, wrappings, browning bags, string, skewers, utensils, the roasting pan, etc. They are all potential hazards for your dog.

If you are throwing away all the wrappings and scraps make sure they are put in a compost bin or trashcan that a dog can’t get into.

Distract your dog from your meal by giving them a treat - like a kong stuffed with a bite of turkey to keep them busy while you sit down to dinner.

Ask your guests to refrain from slipping your dog treats under the table. It’s hard to resist a begging dog, but remind your guests that you will give the dog their own Thanksgiving treat once the human dinner is over.

Having a dog that is happy and healthy is certainly a reason to give thanks. And your dog thanks you each day with unconditional love. 

November 04, 2015

Posted in Dog care, food


Peanut Butter and Dogs: A Love Affair

November is National Peanut Butter Lovers Month and there are few beings that love peanut butter more than dogs. Most of our canine pals are nuts for peanut butter.

Here’s some information about dogs and peanut butter:

Go natural - Peanut butter is safe for dogs and a good source of protein, vitamins and healthy fats. All-natural peanut butter is healthier for your dog because it likely doesn’t have added sugar and salt.

Skip the spoon - We all have a tendency to give our doggie a lick of peanut butter from a spoon, but that might not be wise. Some dogs have be reported to get so excited about the nutty treat that they also ingested the spoon.

Make it smooth - Opt for creamy peanut butter as chunky varieties could be a choking hazard - especially for puppies and tiny doggies.

Watch for peanut allergies - Most dogs never experience a problem with peanut butter, but allergies can develop over time. If you notice a bad reaction (even if your dog didn’t have a problem in the past) it’s best to contact your vet immediately.

Make medicine balls - Peanut butter is a great way to help get dogs to take medicine or pills. Simply hide the pill in a big dollop of peanut butter and they should gobble it up.

Nuts for toys -  Dogs will stay occupied for hours if you buy a toy that can be stuffed with a treat and licking the peanut butter out will enthrall your dog and you’ll have fun watching them try to get every last drop.

Training tricks - When training treats or boring dog biscuits just aren’t motivating your dog as rewards - try peanut butter. Dog love it so much, you’re likely to get better results.

Peanut butter for introductions - If your dog is anxious when meeting new people you might want to make the introduction using peanut butter. Let your guests put a dab of peanut butter on their finger before they meet the dog. This lets the dog make the association that new people are good and they equal tasty treats.

Here’s a peanut butter dog biscuit recipe from from Chef Paula Deen

Bodeen’s Peanut Butter Dog Biscuits

Servings: varies

Prep Time: 15 min

Cook Time: 40 min

Difficulty: Easy

Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup nonfat milk
  • 1 egg
  • 1 cup peanut butter, smooth
  • 2 1/4 to 2 1/2 cups whole wheat flour
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder

Directions

  • Preheat oven to 325 degrees
  • In a large mixing bowl, whisk together the milk, egg and peanut butter
  • Add in the flour and baking powder to make a very stiff dough, using your hands to work in the last of the flour if necessary.
  • Flour a work surface and roll out dough to a 1/4-inch thickness.
  • Cut into desired sizes depending on the size of your dog.
  • Bake on a parchment lined baking tray for approximately 20 minutes.
  • Turn biscuits over and bake for an additional 15 minutes.
  • Remove from oven and allow to cool completely before storing in an airtight container.

Bodine’s Dog Biscuits can also be stored in the freezer for up to 3 months.

IdealPetX wants your pooch to be well cared for with its assortment of dog supplies.

September 08, 2015

Posted in


5 Tips For Back to School Time and Your Dog

Parents are sending their kids back to school, and with all that preparation and excitement its easy to forget about how that change impacts your dog. Your pet is a member of the family has probably been included in all the summer fun activities that took place and now with the kids gone you arent the only one who will notice how quiet and empty the house has become.But there are some ways to pay special attention to your canine pal during this transition.

Parents are sending their kids back to school, and with all that preparation and excitement its easy to forget about how that change impacts your dog. Your pet is a member of the family has probably been included in all the summer fun activities that took place and now with the kids gone you arent the only one who will notice how quiet and empty the house has become.

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But there are some ways to pay special attention to your canine pal during this transition:


  1. Monitor changes in mood: Less activity and attention dogs can have dogs experiencing depression. Be on the lookout for listlessness, lack of energy, loss of appetite, hiding or cowering, and not wanting to play - even when the kids come home. Dogs can also suffer from separation anxiety that will manifest in in erratic behavior such as excessive barking and whining, frantic clawing to get out, destructive chewing, and going to the bathroom in the house. Unlike depression, dog depression, dogs with separation anxiety will be thrilled when family members return home.
  2. Establish a new routine: Dogs love schedules and routine. Remember your dog is part of the family, so make them part of the new routine. Feed them when the kids are having breakfast and getting ready for school. Time dog walks when the kids are headed out or if you walk your children to school so your dog can feel included.
  3. Give them more attention: With the house quieter, make sure that the dog is still getting lots of attention from you. Be sure you are still talking to and playing with your doggie throughout the day. And have kids include the dog in their new schedules - maybe talking the dog for a walk before or after homework.
  4. Make your dog feel special: Just like you did back to school preparations for the kids, now might be the perfect time to pamper the dog. with some home grooming, including giving them a bath and dog shampoo, doing a nail clipping, and maybe treating them to some new dog accessories like a new leash or new toy to play with the pass the time without the kiddos.
  5. Have a health intake and update: Its also a good time to look at whats happening with your dogs health. Weigh them for changes and see if their weight or age indicates a need to change the type of food you are feeding them. Take stock and order any pet meds and pet supplements or flea control treatments.that you use on an ongoing basis.This way youll have them on hand as things get busy.

June 09, 2015

Posted in


The Benefits of Adopting a Dog

Theres nothing better than the unconditional love and companionship of a dog. Thats the reason dogs are called mans best friend. But many dogs no longer have a BFF and have landed in shelters through no fault of their own. October is National Adopt a Dog Month and if youve been considering getting a dog or adding to your existing pack, please consider adopting a shelter or rescue dog.

Theres nothing better than the unconditional love and companionship of a dog. Thats the reason dogs are called mans best friend. But many dogs no longer have a BFF and have landed in shelters through no fault of their own. October is National Adopt a Dog Month and if youve been considering getting a dog or adding to your existing pack, please consider adopting a shelter or rescue dog.


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There are so many benefits to adopting a dog; here a just a few:


Less expensive than pet store dogs - Yes, you will likely paid an adoption fee to a shelter or rescue, but its often a fraction of what you might pay at the pet store. And, often local shelters and rescue organizations will have special drives to get dogs good homes and will waive adoption fees. Plus, any fees you do pay are typically funneled back to the organization to keep their good work going and save more dogs.


Its a more humane option - Lets face it we all want to do the right thing and buying from a pet store or a puppy mill is not helping dogs. In fact, its just encouraging those breeders that are unethical to keep using bad practices and keep dogs in conditions that are not safe or healthy for the animals. Adoption is the right thing to do.


You will save a life - More than 2.7 million dogs are euthanized a year. You will give a chance to a dog that might otherwise be put down prematurely and still has lots of love to give.Often you are their last chance.Seriously!


Its not their fault - Most rescue or shelter dogs are surrendered for other reasons - not behavior problems. Often they are abandoned by their owners because of living situations - moving, no pets allowed, divorce, allergies, etc. These dogs did nothing wrong but might be put down anyway.


They are ready - Shelter and rescue dogs are given all their shots and vaccinations before you take them home. Adoption dogs are also spayed and neutered, That means you will spend less money on the vet and know your dog is protected and healthy.


They are likely housebroken - Often these dogs have already lived with another person or family and will be housebroken and maybe even trained, saving you the time of teaching them the basics.


Love, love, love - These dog will be so grateful for a second chance. They will give you unconditional love, affection, companionship, endless hours of joy and precious moments. Once you adopt dog, you will never be able to imagine life without them.


IdealPetX loves dogs and encourages you to adopt a dog. We also have all the dog supplies, pet meds and accessories that you will need to keep your new dog happy and healthy.
April 08, 2015

Posted in


Good Doggie Dental Health

Our dogs are part of the family and make us smile. And part of being a great dog parent means maintaining good dental health of your best four-legged friend - so,they can smile back at us. September is The American Kennel Clubs Responsible Dog Ownership Month. 

Our dogs are part of the family and make us smile. And part of being a great dog parent means maintaining good dental health of your best four-legged friend - so,they can smile back at us.

Keeping your canine healthy and happy starts with having the right dog accessories and pet supplies on hand to make sure their teeth are in tip top shape. 

We know that brushing your dogs teeth can be a chore. Often they dont like it, but its something that has to be done. Brushing your dogs teeth isnt just about keeping their breath fresh. - its important to your dogs overall health. 

Gum disease is a common, serious problem in dogs. Veterinarians estimate that 85 percent of dogs over five years of age suffer from periodontal disease. Over time, plaque build can turn into tartar and inflame the gums. This cause your dog severe pain, loss of teeth, cause abscesses in their mouth and develop a bacterial infection that can spread through the bloodstream to the kidneys, liver, heart or brain. Periodontal disease is irreversible.Prevention is the key to keeping him healthy and happy. 

We make it easy for you to help your dog maintain good oral care with a variety of doggie dental products. Ideal PetX has everything from complete dental kits to dental wipes that make it easy to clean your dogs teeth. 

So, just like you brush your pearly whites, don't forget about your poochs teeth.