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Summertime Safety for Your Pets

As the temperature rises, we all love spending more time outdoors. But some summertime activities and the heat can be a dangerous combination for your pet. Here are some things to remember as the mercury rises: As the temperature rises, we all love spending more time outdoors. But some summertime activities and the heat can be a dangerous combination for your pet.

Here are some things to remember as the mercury rises:

Go For Vet Checkup
A visit to the veterinarian for a spring or early summer check-up is a must. Make sure your pets get tested for heartworm if they aren't on year-round preventive medication. if not, ask your doctor to recommend a safe flea and tick control program. Make sure your dog's vaccinations are up to date, especially since dogs tend to stay outdoors longer and come into contact with other animals more during the summer months. Fleas and ticks, and the mosquitoes which carry heartworm disease, are more prevalent in warmer months. Ask your veterinarian for an effective preventive to keep these parasites off your dog.

Lots of Fresh Water
Pets can get dehydrated quickly, so give them plenty of fresh, clean water when it's hot outdoors.

Exercise
Limit ExerciseAvoid strenuous exercise on extremely hot days. Take walks in the early mornings or evenings, when the sun's heat is less intense. Try to avoid prolonged exposure to hot asphalt or sand, which can burn your dog's paws.

Get Shady
Make sure your pets have a shady place to get out of the sun, be careful to not over-exercise them, if its really hot, you may consider leaving them at home when its extremely hot. Doghouses are not good shelter during the summer as they can trap heat. You may want to fill a child's wading pool with fresh water for your dog to cool off in.

No Parked Cars!
Not even for a minute. Not even with the car running and air conditioner on. On a warm day, temperatures inside a vehicle can rise rapidly to dangerous levels. On an 85-degree day, for example, the temperature inside a car with the windows opened slightly can reach 102 degrees within 10 minutes. After 30 minutes, the temperature will reach 120 degrees. Your pet may suffer irreversible organ damage or die.

Take a Safe Swim
Do not leave pets unsupervised around a pool-not all dogs are good swimmers. Introduce your pets to water gradually and make sure they wear flotation devices when on boats. Rinse your dog off after swimming to remove chlorine or salt from his fur, and try to keep your dog from drinking pool water, which contains chlorine and other chemicals that could cause stomach upset.

Summer Style
Feel free to trim longer hair on your dog, but never shave your dog: The layers of dogs' coats protect them from overheating and sunburn. Brushing cats more often than usual can prevent problems caused by excessive heat. And be sure that any sunscreen or insect repellent product you use on your pets is labeled specifically for use on animals.

Have Fido Skips the Fireworks
Please leave pets at home when you head out fireworks display. They are often very scared of the noise. Also, exposure to lit fireworks can potentially result in severe burns or trauma to curious pets and even unused fireworks can be hazardous. Many types of fireworks contain potentially toxic substances such as potassium nitrate, copper, chlorates, arsenic and other heavy metals.

Off my Lawn
Keep dogs off of lawns that have been chemically treated or fertilized for 24 hours (or according to package instructions), and away from potentially toxic plants and flowers.

Sunblock

Get like people, dogs can get sunburned. Dogs, especially those with short hair, white fur, and pink skin, can sunburn. Limit your dog's exposure during the day and apply sunblock to his ears and nose 30 minutes before going outside.
Ideal Pet Rx Staff
Ideal Pet Rx Staff

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